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A Year On the Farm ()

Collecting Rural England ()

Digging Deeper - Open Store ()

Digging Deeper - Ploughs ()

Forces For Change ()

Making Rural England ()

Our Country Lives ()

Shaping the Land ()

The Ladybird Gallery ()

Town and Country ()

Wagon Walk ()

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Animals ()

Arts and crafts ()

Collecting ()

Countryside ()

Farming and agriculture ()

Food and drink ()

Health nutrition and medicine ()

Historical era ()

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Transport ()

War and conflict ()

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Forces For Change ()

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Showing 33 Items

Steam Ploughing Copy

DIGGING DEEPER - PLOUGHS;FARMING AND AGRICULTURE;

Machinery 100 Years Ago Copy

COLLECTING RURAL ENGLAND;COLLECTING;

Mattress Copy Copy

TOWN AND COUNTRY;HEALTH NUTRITION AND MEDICINE;LOCAL HISTORY;

Millers Wagon Copy Copy

WAGON WALK;FOOD AND DRINK;PEOPLE;TRANSPORT;

PLASTER CAST HANDS Copy

MAKING RURAL ENGLAND;COUNTRYSIDE;PEOPLE;

Mattress Copy

TOWN AND COUNTRY;HEALTH NUTRITION AND MEDICINE;LOCAL HISTORY;

King Alfred Copy

A YEAR ON THE FARM;ARTS AND CRAFTS;LOCAL HISTORY;

Hop Stilts Copy

A YEAR ON THE FARM;FARMING AND AGRICULTURE;

Millers Wagon Copy

WAGON WALK;FOOD AND DRINK;PEOPLE;TRANSPORT;

Harvest Jug Copy

A YEAR ON THE FARM;ARTS AND CRAFTS;FARMING AND AGRICULTURE;FOOD AND DRINK;WEATHER AND ENVIRONMENT;

GIANT TEAPOT Copy

MAKING RURAL ENGLAND;ARTS AND CRAFTS;

Flail Copy

FORCES FOR CHANGE;FARMING AND AGRICULTURE;

Ferguson Tractor Copy

COLLECTING RURAL ENGLAND;FARMING AND AGRICULTURE;

King Alfred

A YEAR ON THE FARM;ARTS AND CRAFTS;LOCAL HISTORY;

Hop Stilts

A YEAR ON THE FARM;FARMING AND AGRICULTURE;

Steam Ploughing

DIGGING DEEPER - PLOUGHS;FARMING AND AGRICULTURE;

Machinery 100 Years Ago

COLLECTING RURAL ENGLAND;COLLECTING;

Wellies

TOWN AND COUNTRY;COUNTRYSIDE;PEOPLE;WEATHER AND ENVIRONMENT;

Harvest Jug

A YEAR ON THE FARM;ARTS AND CRAFTS;FARMING AND AGRICULTURE;FOOD AND DRINK;WEATHER AND ENVIRONMENT;

Salmon Trap

A YEAR ON THE FARM;ANIMALS;FOOD AND DRINK;HEALTH NUTRITION AND MEDICINE;

Shepherds Walking Stick

A YEAR ON THE FARM;ARTS AND CRAFTS;PEOPLE;

Picnic Basket

A YEAR ON THE FARM;COUNTRYSIDE;FOOD AND DRINK;

Mattress

TOWN AND COUNTRY;HEALTH NUTRITION AND MEDICINE;LOCAL HISTORY;

Man Trap

MAKING RURAL ENGLAND;COUNTRYSIDE;WAR AND CONFLICT;

GIANT TEAPOT

MAKING RURAL ENGLAND;ARTS AND CRAFTS;

PLASTER CAST HANDS

MAKING RURAL ENGLAND;COUNTRYSIDE;PEOPLE;

TURNWREST PLOUGH

COLLECTING RURAL ENGLAND;COLLECTING;FARMING AND AGRICULTURE;

Ferguson Tractor

COLLECTING RURAL ENGLAND;FARMING AND AGRICULTURE;

Womens Land Army Uniform

FORCES FOR CHANGE;HISTORICAL ERA;WAR AND CONFLICT;

Flail

FORCES FOR CHANGE;FARMING AND AGRICULTURE;

Suttons Seeds Display Cabinet

FORCES FOR CHANGE;FARMING AND AGRICULTURE;

Millers Wagon

WAGON WALK;FOOD AND DRINK;PEOPLE;TRANSPORT;

Wagoner’s Belt

A YEAR ON THE FARM;ARTS AND CRAFTS;FARMING AND AGRICULTURE;PEOPLE;

Steam Ploughing Copy

Digging Deeper - Ploughs;Farming and agriculture;

Born in Wiltshire into a Quaker family, John Fowler (1826-1864) became one of Britain's most successful agricultural engineers and invented steam ploughing.

Fowler was concerned with the cost of manual labour needed when cultivating land. In the 1850s he came up with the idea of using steam power instead. His method was to set a steam engine at both ends of a field, which between them would draw the plough across by cable.

Fowler exported his 'double-engine' across the world. However, as steam ploughing machinery was too expensive for most farmers, much was done by contractors. These teams often comprised four men and a boy who lived and travelled together in a van containing all the equipment.

Show me more

Digging Deeper - Ploughs;

Farming and agriculture;

Machinery 100 Years Ago Copy

Collecting Rural England;Collecting;

At the Royal Agricultural Show in Cambridge in 1951 people flocked to see the Museum's display of Machinery 100 Years Ago. This old equipment sat only metres away from the very machines that threatened its existence. The countryside was steeped in history yet desperately in need of modernisation.

Show me more

Collecting Rural England;

Collecting;

Mattress Copy Copy

Town and Country;Health nutrition and medicine;Local history;

This mattress was found walled up in a house in Titchfield, Hampshire, and may date from the seventeenth century or earlier. It consists of thick plaits of three, sewn together and made of Carex, a type of sedge. The underneath is fluffy, like carpet pile, and is probably unfinished.
Such mattresses were used either for laying out the dead before they were placed in the coffin or for women in childbirth. Unsurprisingly, they would probably have been burnt after use, so this mattress may not have ever been used for either purpose.
These mattresses are also commonly found as part of tomb monuments, such as this one of Chaloner Chute (c.1595-1659) at the Vyne Estate in Hampshire. Used for both noble and common monuments, it may be a statement about Death as the great equaliser.

Show me more

Town and Country;

Health nutrition and medicine;

Local history;

Millers Wagon Copy Copy

Wagon Walk;Food and drink;People;Transport;

This is a Miller's wagon, owned by a man called Benjamin Cole. He ran the Codicote and Kimpton mills near Luton, on the Hertfordshire border. He had to abandon both of these mills because the River Mimram became too low to power their milling stones.

Benjamin also owned Hyde Mill, which drew its water from another river. It was located down the road from the railway, a great advantage over other mills as it meant he could export his flour to town and city centres. The road to the railway was steep and his wagon would often carry three tons. Two horses were needed to pull it when fully loaded.

The wagon also has a six-pointed star on its front. Rather than being a Jewish symbol, it is believed to simply be decorative.

Show me more

Wagon Walk;

Food and drink;

People;

Transport;

PLASTER CAST HANDS Copy

Making Rural England;Countryside;People;

In its early years the Museum of English Rural Life toured the nation's many country shows, picking up objects from farmers and the public.
This type of plough is called a turn wrest and is commonly found in Kent, where we collected it in 1955. We put it on display at the Shillingford country fair the next year. Next time you're at a country fair keep an eye out for old farm machinery - they can tell you a lot about our rural history.

Show me more

Making Rural England;

Countryside;

People;

Mattress Copy

Town and Country;Health nutrition and medicine;Local history;

This mattress was found walled up in a house in Titchfield, Hampshire, and may date from the seventeenth century or earlier. It consists of thick plaits of three, sewn together and made of Carex, a type of sedge. The underneath is fluffy, like carpet pile, and is probably unfinished.
Such mattresses were used either for laying out the dead before they were placed in the coffin or for women in childbirth. Unsurprisingly, they would probably have been burnt after use, so this mattress may not have ever been used for either purpose.
These mattresses are also commonly found as part of tomb monuments, such as this one of Chaloner Chute (c.1595-1659) at the Vyne Estate in Hampshire. Used for both noble and common monuments, it may be a statement about Death as the great equaliser.

Show me more

Town and Country;

Health nutrition and medicine;

Local history;

King Alfred Copy

A Year On the Farm;Arts and crafts;Local history;

If you think this figure has a regal air about him, you would not be wrong.

This is a straw 'sculpture' of the Anglo-Saxon King Alfred. Originally, the figure had a wooden sword in one hand and a straw scroll in the other, representing both the warrior and the scholar. It is actually one of three figures made by master thatcher Jesse Maycock for the annual University College ball, Oxford, in 1961. One figure was a seated King Alfred, while the other was William Archdeacon of Durham, the founder of the College in 1247. Jesse created King Alfred using the same techniques involved in making a thatched roof, where straw or reeds are used protect the top of a building.

Show me more

A Year On the Farm;

Arts and crafts;

Local history;

Hop Stilts Copy

A Year On the Farm;Farming and agriculture;

Stilts are not just for circus acts, but are exceptionally suited to hop farming. Hops are natural climbers, and farmers train them up long poles connected by string at their tops. To reach the hops and to maintain the strings, workers often found it easier to use stilts to reach the heights rather than more cumbersome ladders. Hops are, of course, an essential ingredient in brewing beer. Our pair of stilts are from a farm near Selborne, Hampshire.

Show me more

A Year On the Farm;

Farming and agriculture;

Millers Wagon Copy

Wagon Walk;Food and drink;People;Transport;

This is a Miller's wagon, owned by a man called Benjamin Cole. He ran the Codicote and Kimpton mills near Luton, on the Hertfordshire border. He had to abandon both of these mills because the River Mimram became too low to power their milling stones.

Benjamin also owned Hyde Mill, which drew its water from another river. It was located down the road from the railway, a great advantage over other mills as it meant he could export his flour to town and city centres. The road to the railway was steep and his wagon would often carry three tons. Two horses were needed to pull it when fully loaded.

The wagon also has a six-pointed star on its front. Rather than being a Jewish symbol, it is believed to simply be decorative.

Show me more

Wagon Walk;

Food and drink;

People;

Transport;

Harvest Jug Copy

A Year On the Farm;Arts and crafts;Farming and agriculture;Food and drink;Weather and environment;

This jug was made for the boozy celebration which comes after a successful harvest.
The baking sun sits smiling at the centre of a mariner's compass on one side, a fitting design for a jug made in the seafaring county of Devon. The varying hues of orange and yellow are rooted in the spent soil and blazing skies of a hot summer's day.
On the opposite side a cockerel sits among flowers, and the zigzag decoration around the neck of the jug is typical of Barnstaple Ware. The designs are all scratched into the glaze, a technique known as 'sgraffiato'.


On the back of the jug there is this verse:
Harvest is come all
busy now in making
of the Barley mow if
you the Barley mow
neglect of Good ale you
can not then expect
August 1838, John Prouse, Hartland

Show me more

A Year On the Farm;

Arts and crafts;

Farming and agriculture;

Food and drink;

Weather and environment;

GIANT TEAPOT Copy

Making Rural England;Arts and crafts;

This mammoth teapot was designed and made by Michael Cardew in 1945-6 at the Winchcombe Pottery in Gloucestershire.
The pot can hold 29.5 litres of tea, and is supported on an iron frame which allows it to be tipped and also manoeuvred thanks to small wheels at its base. It is not an anomaly, but is actually a type of teapot reputed to have been used at various types of large meetings across the countryside.
This teapot was part of a large collection of traditional craft items originally collected by the British Council in 1946, and which toured both Australia and New Zealand.

Show me more

Making Rural England;

Arts and crafts;

Flail Copy

Forces For Change;Farming and agriculture;

When you look at a flail, you are looking at the sweat, pain and labour farmworkers endured for hundreds of years. Flails are just two sticks, tied together at one end with leather. One stick would be grasped, and the other swung at corn on a barn floor to separate the grain from the husk through sheer force.
This was hard labour, but occupied many people. When the process was simplified with threshing machines it caused riots, as many people were suddenly without a job. Rioters smashed machines to preserve their livelihoods, but ultimately it was the machines that won.

Show me more

Forces For Change;

Farming and agriculture;

Ferguson Tractor Copy

Collecting Rural England;Farming and agriculture;

This Ferguson Tractor was found a mess on a scrapheap by a retired teacher at RycoteWood College. He enlisted the help of students at the college to lovingly repair and restore the tractor to working condition and was afterwards bought by the Museum with the help of the Science Museum.

The tractor was probably manufactured in 1948 and is one of the earliest types built by the Standard Motor Company at their Banner Lane plant in Coventry.

Show me more

Collecting Rural England;

Farming and agriculture;

King Alfred

A Year On the Farm;Arts and crafts;Local history;

If you think this figure has a regal air about him, you would not be wrong.

This is a straw 'sculpture' of the Anglo-Saxon King Alfred. Originally, the figure had a wooden sword in one hand and a straw scroll in the other, representing both the warrior and the scholar. It is actually one of three figures made by master thatcher Jesse Maycock for the annual University College ball, Oxford, in 1961. One figure was a seated King Alfred, while the other was William Archdeacon of Durham, the founder of the College in 1247. Jesse created King Alfred using the same techniques involved in making a thatched roof, where straw or reeds are used protect the top of a building.

Show me more

A Year On the Farm;

Arts and crafts;

Local history;

Hop Stilts

A Year On the Farm;Farming and agriculture;

Stilts are not just for circus acts, but are exceptionally suited to hop farming. Hops are natural climbers, and farmers train them up long poles connected by string at their tops. To reach the hops and to maintain the strings, workers often found it easier to use stilts to reach the heights rather than more cumbersome ladders. Hops are, of course, an essential ingredient in brewing beer. Our pair of stilts are from a farm near Selborne, Hampshire.

Show me more

A Year On the Farm;

Farming and agriculture;

Steam Ploughing

Digging Deeper - Ploughs;Farming and agriculture;

Born in Wiltshire into a Quaker family, John Fowler (1826-1864) became one of Britain's most successful agricultural engineers and invented steam ploughing.

Fowler was concerned with the cost of manual labour needed when cultivating land. In the 1850s he came up with the idea of using steam power instead. His method was to set a steam engine at both ends of a field, which between them would draw the plough across by cable.

Fowler exported his 'double-engine' across the world. However, as steam ploughing machinery was too expensive for most farmers, much was done by contractors. These teams often comprised four men and a boy who lived and travelled together in a van containing all the equipment.

Show me more

Digging Deeper - Ploughs;

Farming and agriculture;

Machinery 100 Years Ago

Collecting Rural England;Collecting;

At the Royal Agricultural Show in Cambridge in 1951 people flocked to see the Museum's display of Machinery 100 Years Ago. This old equipment sat only metres away from the very machines that threatened its existence. The countryside was steeped in history yet desperately in need of modernisation.

Show me more

Collecting Rural England;

Collecting;

Wellies

Town and Country;Countryside;People;Weather and environment;

Wellies are an essential part of English outdoor clothing. Come rain, flood, hail or snow, wellies will keep your feet warm and dry. These ones were owned and used by Michael Eavis, dairy farmer and founder of Glastonbury Festival.

Wellies were designed for people who worked in the countryside, but you're now just as likely to see Kate Moss sporting a pair as a Somerset farmer. Glastonbury Festival turned the humble welly into a fashion item, as newspapers featured celebrities struggling through the infamous mud in their boots.

Michael Eavis, has introduced generations of mostly urban festival-goers to a unique version of the countryside. Glastonbury Festival is both town and country, with roads, paths, shops and communities temporarily planted on a patchwork of fields.
Michael's own wellies were made in France by Le Chameau. He described them as 'bloody good wellies.'

Show me more

Town and Country;

Countryside;

People;

Weather and environment;

Harvest Jug

A Year On the Farm;Arts and crafts;Farming and agriculture;Food and drink;Weather and environment;

This jug was made for the boozy celebration which comes after a successful harvest.
The baking sun sits smiling at the centre of a mariner's compass on one side, a fitting design for a jug made in the seafaring county of Devon. The varying hues of orange and yellow are rooted in the spent soil and blazing skies of a hot summer's day.
On the opposite side a cockerel sits among flowers, and the zigzag decoration around the neck of the jug is typical of Barnstaple Ware. The designs are all scratched into the glaze, a technique known as 'sgraffiato'.


On the back of the jug there is this verse:
Harvest is come all
busy now in making
of the Barley mow if
you the Barley mow
neglect of Good ale you
can not then expect
August 1838, John Prouse, Hartland

Show me more

A Year On the Farm;

Arts and crafts;

Farming and agriculture;

Food and drink;

Weather and environment;

Salmon Trap

A Year On the Farm;Animals;Food and drink;Health nutrition and medicine;

The best way to trap salmon is to make them trap themselves.
So effective is the design of the 'putcher' that it has barely changed in 1000 years. Fishermen on the River Severn would arrange dozens of these traps between sticks buried in the mud of the river and forming a wall. The salmon would then simply swim into the traps, and the fishermen would collect them.
Until the 1950s seasonal salmon were caught using basketwork traps like this. They are now more commonly fished year round on special farms. But farmed fish have fewer Omega-3s, which are beneficial to human health, so they are sometimes fed genetically modified cereals to add these extra fatty acids.

Show me more

A Year On the Farm;

Animals;

Food and drink;

Health nutrition and medicine;

Shepherds Walking Stick

A Year On the Farm;Arts and crafts;People;

The patience and skill that have been poured into this practical work of art is obvious. That it took years to make is confirmed on the stick itself, which proclaims: 'Carved by a Poor Shepherd in the years 1844 to 1849'. Alongside this, the shepherd artist also names himself as Henry Beecham from Kidlington, Oxfordshire.
The stick is also a twin. A near-identical example was carved by his cousin, Thomas Beecham, while he stayed with his uncle for a period. Henry used his time well, learning various shepherd remedies and potions which he sold around the region. His successes allowed him to found the company Beecham's Pills, which would go on to become the multinational SmithKlineBeecham, and is now GlaxoSmithKline. Thomas began his life as a poor shepherd much like Henry, but by his own sharp and entrepreneurial mind he literally went from rags to riches.

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A Year On the Farm;

Arts and crafts;

People;

Picnic Basket

A Year On the Farm;Countryside;Food and drink;

This is an 'En Route' tea-making basket produced by Drew & Co of London probably around 1905.
Originally, a basket like this was associated with railway travel, and even the horse drawn carriage. But by the Edwardian era, it was increasingly about the relationship between the motor car and the countryside - going for an afternoon jaunt into the country and having a nice cup of tea in a secluded scenic spot before returning to the clamour of the town.

Show me more

A Year On the Farm;

Countryside;

Food and drink;

Mattress

Town and Country;Health nutrition and medicine;Local history;

This mattress was found walled up in a house in Titchfield, Hampshire, and may date from the seventeenth century or earlier. It consists of thick plaits of three, sewn together and made of Carex, a type of sedge. The underneath is fluffy, like carpet pile, and is probably unfinished.
Such mattresses were used either for laying out the dead before they were placed in the coffin or for women in childbirth. Unsurprisingly, they would probably have been burnt after use, so this mattress may not have ever been used for either purpose.
These mattresses are also commonly found as part of tomb monuments, such as this one of Chaloner Chute (c.1595-1659) at the Vyne Estate in Hampshire. Used for both noble and common monuments, it may be a statement about Death as the great equaliser.

Show me more

Town and Country;

Health nutrition and medicine;

Local history;

Man Trap

Making Rural England;Countryside;War and conflict;

This is a trap designed to catch people. Landowners sometimes resorted to man traps in order to catch people trespassing on their land. People trespassed for a variety of reasons; sometimes for poaching - the illegal killing of animals on private land - or sometimes simply for hunting and gathering food to feed their families.
After much maiming on the parts of both landowners and trespassers, man traps with teeth were made illegal in 1827. They were replaced by 'humane' man traps, which were designed to trap people without undue damage.

Show me more

Making Rural England;

Countryside;

War and conflict;

GIANT TEAPOT

Making Rural England;Arts and crafts;

This mammoth teapot was designed and made by Michael Cardew in 1945-6 at the Winchcombe Pottery in Gloucestershire.
The pot can hold 29.5 litres of tea, and is supported on an iron frame which allows it to be tipped and also manoeuvred thanks to small wheels at its base. It is not an anomaly, but is actually a type of teapot reputed to have been used at various types of large meetings across the countryside.
This teapot was part of a large collection of traditional craft items originally collected by the British Council in 1946, and which toured both Australia and New Zealand.

Show me more

Making Rural England;

Arts and crafts;

PLASTER CAST HANDS

Making Rural England;Countryside;People;

In its early years the Museum of English Rural Life toured the nation's many country shows, picking up objects from farmers and the public.
This type of plough is called a turn wrest and is commonly found in Kent, where we collected it in 1955. We put it on display at the Shillingford country fair the next year. Next time you're at a country fair keep an eye out for old farm machinery - they can tell you a lot about our rural history.

Show me more

Making Rural England;

Countryside;

People;

TURNWREST PLOUGH

Collecting Rural England;Collecting;Farming and agriculture;

In its early years the Museum of English Rural Life toured the nation's many country shows, picking up objects from farmers and the public.
This type of plough is called a turn wrest and is commonly found in Kent, where we collected it in 1955. We put it on display at the Shillingford country fair the next year. Next time you're at a country fair keep an eye out for old farm machinery - they can tell you a lot about our rural history.

Show me more

Collecting Rural England;

Collecting;

Farming and agriculture;

Ferguson Tractor

Collecting Rural England;Farming and agriculture;

This Ferguson Tractor was found a mess on a scrapheap by a retired teacher at RycoteWood College. He enlisted the help of students at the college to lovingly repair and restore the tractor to working condition and was afterwards bought by the Museum with the help of the Science Museum.

The tractor was probably manufactured in 1948 and is one of the earliest types built by the Standard Motor Company at their Banner Lane plant in Coventry.

Show me more

Collecting Rural England;

Farming and agriculture;

Womens Land Army Uniform

Forces For Change;Historical era;War and conflict;

The Women's Land Army (WLA) was created in 1915 to help farmers cope with the shortage of male labour as a result of the First World War. It was brought back into action for the Second World War, at first as voluntary service and then as a form of conscription.
Sceptics did not believe that women would be suited to the hard labour involved in farmwork, but the Army of 65,000 Land Girls went on to produce the majority of Britain's food by 1943, happily proved the critics wrong. One such Land Girl was Doreen Thorp, whose uniform this was while she served with the WLA from 1939-1947.

Show me more

Forces For Change;

Historical era;

War and conflict;

Flail

Forces For Change;Farming and agriculture;

When you look at a flail, you are looking at the sweat, pain and labour farmworkers endured for hundreds of years. Flails are just two sticks, tied together at one end with leather. One stick would be grasped, and the other swung at corn on a barn floor to separate the grain from the husk through sheer force.
This was hard labour, but occupied many people. When the process was simplified with threshing machines it caused riots, as many people were suddenly without a job. Rioters smashed machines to preserve their livelihoods, but ultimately it was the machines that won.

Show me more

Forces For Change;

Farming and agriculture;

Suttons Seeds Display Cabinet

Forces For Change;Farming and agriculture;

The soft wooden hues, globes of glass and intricate carving of this display case would not be out of place in a Victorian apothecary. This case, however, is for seeds.

The bottom of the case proudly proclaims 'Queen's Seedsmen Reading' - the Queen in question being Victoria, and the Seedsmen being Suttons Seeds company. Famous for inventing the paper seed packet, Suttons led the world in the cultivation, supply, marketing and distribution of bulbs and seeds in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This case advertises the different varieties of grasses the company produced, and was bought at a farm sale in Oxfordshire by the donor in 1950.

Show me more

Forces For Change;

Farming and agriculture;

Millers Wagon

Wagon Walk;Food and drink;People;Transport;

This is a Miller's wagon, owned by a man called Benjamin Cole. He ran the Codicote and Kimpton mills near Luton, on the Hertfordshire border. He had to abandon both of these mills because the River Mimram became too low to power their milling stones.

Benjamin also owned Hyde Mill, which drew its water from another river. It was located down the road from the railway, a great advantage over other mills as it meant he could export his flour to town and city centres. The road to the railway was steep and his wagon would often carry three tons. Two horses were needed to pull it when fully loaded.

The wagon also has a six-pointed star on its front. Rather than being a Jewish symbol, it is believed to simply be decorative.

Show me more

Wagon Walk;

Food and drink;

People;

Transport;

Wagoner’s Belt

A Year On the Farm;Arts and crafts;Farming and agriculture;People;

This belt was given to a wagoner on his retirement, in recognition of his great skill. There was once a strict hierarchy on farms. Horsemen were at the top and worked with wagons and ploughs. Everyone knew their rank, referring to each other with terms such as 'first man' or 'fourth boy'.

Show me more

A Year On the Farm;

Arts and crafts;

Farming and agriculture;

People;